UAG

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    Museum Exhibition Seminar presents Paradoxes of Play!

    Finally, after much hard work, deliberation, investigation, and play ourselves, the Museum Studies Exhibition Seminar class is proud to present our final exhibition, Paradoxes of Play: Conrete and Conceptualist Proposals from Brazil and Beyond! Here are a few pictures from our opening reception this past Friday. Come out and experience it for yourself at the UAG from now until December 9, Monday-Friday 10am-4pm. Also, check back with the blog within the next few weeks to see pictures and hear stories of how the seminar students worked together to install this exhibition.

    Categories: 
    • Undergraduate Work
    • UAG

    Possible exhibition titles

     

    MES: Titles, Objects, and Concepts, Oh My

    In the Museum Exhibition Seminar class this past week, we consolidated what we had been learning about from readings, discussions, and lecturers (including Daniel Quiles and Jessica Gogan) and began to narrow in on what we might like to see in our own exhibit. We noted some specific objects we might like to use, as well as various general concepts, and even a few titles/subtitles.

    Categories: 
    • Undergraduate Work
    • UAG

    Students listen to museum director Lynn Zelevansky

     

    Museum Exhibition Seminar: Behind-the-Scenes at CMoA

    The class got a special treat on an otherwise dreary Monday this week. We met up with museum director Lynn Zelevansky and associate curator Katherine Brodbeck to hear them talk about the intensive process behind creating the upcoming CMoA (and then traveling) exhibit Hélio Oiticica: To Organize Delirium, opening this Saturday, October 1, and running through the end of the year. As Oiticica and his work connect very well to the artists and concepts we've been discussing, this was a great opportunity to start making connections between our readings/discussions and real-world materializations of similar ideas.

    Categories: 
    • Undergraduate Work
    • UAG
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    Museum Exhibition Seminar: Past Themes

    After a successful book-browsing session set up for us by librarian Kate Joranson, the class got to work exploring catalogues of related past exhibitions and conceptual books in more detail, picking out relavant themes, common connections, and interesting language. The class also began thinking about how these past exhibitions can relate to the one we will create. Hint: COLOR.

    Categories: 
    • Undergraduate Work
    • UAG
  • Exhibition poster, designed by Aisling Quigley
     

    Data (after)Lives opens tomorrow!!

    Opening Event: Thursday, September 8th, 4-6pm

    This exhibition incorporates the work and research of Rich Pell (Curator at the Center for PostNatural History), Paul Vanouse, Steve Rowell, Aaron Henderson, and Heather Dewey-Hagborg. Paulina Pardo Gaviria also reinterpets the work of Letícia Parente (1930-1991). Also co-curated by Dr. Alison Langmead, Dr. Josh Ellenbogen, and Isabelle Chartier. Design associates: Aisling Quigley and Jennifer Donnelly. 

    Categories: 
    • Decomposing Bodies
    • Graduate Work
    • Faculty Work
    • UAG
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    Museum Studies Exhibition Seminar Kicks Off!

    This fall's HAA 1020/2020: Museum Studies Exhibition Seminar students began their journey into the world of contemporary Latin American art by exploring the exhibition catalog Open Work and pulling out some terms, phrases, and quotes that stuck out to them.

    Categories: 
    • Undergraduate Work
    • UAG
  • Entering data at my work station in the University Art Gallery

     

    Collective Access: A Fresh View of the UAG

    As a University Art Gallery Intern, I am working to update and standardize the online database system, Collective Access, in conjunction with the old system, Past Perfect, and paper files to create a more comprehensive and accessible database. Additionally, I am creating a Collective Access Data Entry Guide to ensure the system is consistent in the future. This position is very rewarding as it allows me to enrich the resources the UAG offers to art history researchers and to the curious public alike. The breadth of the database is quite extensive, cataloging basic information, physical characteristics, geography/culture, valuation, etc. Of all of these categories, I find the condition reports to be the most fascinating piece of information. Currently, I am working on updating the Nicholas Lochoff Collection, displayed in the Cloister of the Frick Fine Arts building. The resources for this collection are extensive and a very detailed condition report was conducted on several of the pieces in 2002. Physical maintenance was conducted on these pieces in 2003. It is extremely interesting to see both the natural aging of the materials and works as well as the impact of the restoration by comparing the first condition report to the treatment report following the maintenance. This internship has been a fulfilling, educational, and unique capstone to the Museum Studies minor. 

     

    Categories: 
    • Current Projects
    • Academic Interns
    • Undergraduate Work
    • UAG
    • Collecting Knowledge Pittsburgh
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    The Marbles Go to London

    I'm still inputting data about the Elgin Marbles (now we're calling them the 'Parthenon Marbles') into Itinera.  For your intellectual curiosity, let me educate you a little bit about the international controversy that surrounds these ancient marbles statues.

    The artist Phidias sculpted the Parthenon Marbles as decoration for the Parthenon in Athens, Greece between ca. 447 - 438 BCE.  However, although Athens was once a leading city, it diminished into a sketchy, decrepit neighborhood with a far-off a history of grandeur.  By the time Lord Elgin (also known as the ambassador, Thomas Bruce) became interested in the Marbles, Athens was already in tatters.  His interest was sparked by the decorative Marbles, and he told his secretary, William Richard Hamilton, to check out the Marbles in July 1800.  Hamilton also brought along the artist Giovanni Battista Lusieri and a group of other artists to draw the statues at the Acropolis, including the Parthenon Marbles.

    This was all in the early 1800s, when tensions were brewing around Europe because of the Napoleonic Wars.  So in February 1801, Bruce's artists were denied entrace to the Acropolis because of paranoia that the French would attack Turkey after the invasion of Egypt.  Unless Bruce could send a firman, or letter of permission, to the Athenian government allowing the artist to have access to the Marbles, they were finished.

    After some procrastination, Bruce requested a firman at the Porte in Athens, Greece, which became (debatably) official by July 1801.  The firman granted the artists access to the Marbles, and Bruce also threw in a clause stating that the artists had permission to move the Parthenon Marbles from Athens to London, England.

    Next week, I'll post about the controversy that surrounds the Parthenon Marbles.  Stay tuned!

    Categories: 
    • Mobility/Exchange
    • Visual Knowledge
    • Current Projects
    • Itinera
    • Undergraduate Work
    • UAG
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    HAAARCH!!! 2015 Exhibition Map and Schedule

    Edited by Stefan Proost

    Categories: 
    • HAAARCH!!! 2015
    • Undergraduate Work
    • UAG
    • Underwood and Underwood, Traveling in the Holy Land through the Stereoscope
    • Six Degrees of Francis Bacon
    Underwood and Underwood, Traveling in the Holy Land through the Stereoscope

    Underwood and Underwood, The Pool of Siloam, --outside of Jerusalem, Palestine, 1900, 2 photographs mounted on card; (8.5x17cm). From a collection of stereo views of Israel/Palestine c.1900. Collection of Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library, University of Toronto. http://haagradsymposium.pitt.edu/Abstracts/Richmond-Moll.pdf 

     

    A Reflection on Debating Visual Knowledge

    Earlier this month, students in History of Art and Architecture and Information Science at the University of Pittsburgh hosted Debating Visual Knowledge, an interdisciplinary graduate symposium. It was an honor to have Patrick Jagoda and Simone Osthoff participate as keynote speakers, as well as many other inspiring and diverse thinkers and makers. Highlights included a panel on curating with Terry Smith, Cynthia Morton, Alison Langmead, and Dan Byers, opportunities to experience the work of filmmakers Ross Nugent and Mike Maraden, Ella Mason and Joanna Reed of Yes Brain Dance Theater, and a Finnbogi Petursson exhibition curated by Murray Horne at Wood Street Galleries. We heard 14 presentations on a huge variety of topics from grad students who had travelled nationally and internationally to be here, and were able to workshop papers by two participants. We also toured Configuring Disciplines: Fragments of an Encyclopedia at the University Art Gallery.

    I hope that we can continue the many specific and fascinating conversations raised that weekend as we post videos and further thoughts to the Constellations website, collaborate with our graduate journal Contemporaneity, and produce digital projects that present the results of this event. I think we have an opportunity here to become a network of researchers who are a resource for each other because of some common interests. We take images seriously as sources of new knowledge, not just reflections of other knowledge. We share a concern about focusing on “the visual” as something specific, as something that matters as a historical concept, but not always, not necessarily, as separate from other domains. Most of all, we think that the study of visual material and sensory experience does not belong to a single discipline. We all have to reckon with traditional disciplinary boundaries in our work and can benefit from the support of a community in doing so.

    When we started developing the symposium, we were intentionally vague about what we wanted to happen, and the conversations throughout our process were both exciting and confusing. We took a risk and refused to decide what exactly we meant by ‘visual knowledge’, what kinds of material would count, or which scholars would fit. Really the only thing the CFP asserted (besides that visual knowledge is in many places and means many things to many people) is that visual knowledge is different from language, a choice that continues to bring up important questions. By working as a multi-disciplinary group, we were able to invite work across a broad variety of areas and in formats other than papers--like posters, artworks, and workshops. At the same time, we learned how difficult interdisciplinarity can be to achieve, and I think our CFP still spoke most readily to humanities scholars. There is so much ground that must be covered in order to make non-superficial bridges between the cultures, communication networks, and languages of different disciplines.

    We took some baby steps though, and the biggest payoff for me was that our CFP, and the idea of visual knowledge being put forward jointly by art historians and information scientists, attracted people who all shared a feeling that their work requires interdisciplinarity. I believe that this sensibility alone is a powerful idea, that young scholars who have this feeling should get connected early on to affirm that their work can develop in this way. We also were successful in experimenting with traditional conference structure and in thinking about what it is we really want to get out of a graduate symposium. It is clear to me now that while opportunities to present in front of auditorium audiences are important for us as developing scholars, working groups and roundtables are where we really have the productive conversations of which we are in search when we travel to conferences.

    I am really excited about how collaboration between people in different disciplines permits work that could never be done by one person. Humanities scholars don’t publish multiple-author papers very often, but to me this seems necessary. Twentieth-century photographer Berenice Abbott commented, when talking about how she tried to collaborate with scientists to make photographs to teach physics in the late 1950s, that one of her main arguments with them was that photography is a lifetime profession too, and that if true expertise in photography could be combined with other scholars’ expertise in physics, the whole would be greater than the sum of the parts. Many other examples of this kind of situation came up in talks during the symposium. We need also to talk about the difficulties in collaboration—how it can be slow and inefficient, how it can be socially and emotionally demanding.

    Debating Visual Knowledge is aiming to extend outward the constellations model that the History of Art and Architecture department at Pitt has been working with for the last few years. In our department, the identification of important themes and terms facilitate a specific kind of scholarly collaboration between experts in different fields. This environment has resulted in co-authored digital projects, co-taught courses, and this symposium, which seeks to apply these approaches beyond our department and make contact with others who are working in convergent ways.

    This reflection is cross-posted on Nexus, a blog hosted by University of Maryland’s Michelle Smith Collaboratory for Visual Culture.

     

    Categories: 
    • Visual Knowledge
    • Current Projects
    • Debating Visual Knowledge
    • Graduate Work
    • UAG

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