UAG

    • African Heritage Room Ceremonial Key
    • class goes to the Frick Library to see Avinoff water colors
    • Possible Posters
    African Heritage Room Ceremonial Key

    This is a close up of the ceremonial key given to the committee after the Dedication ceremony.

     

    2017 HAA 1020 Museum Studies Exhibition Seminar!

    Hello and welcome to HAA 1020 Exhibition Seminar of 2017 blog!

     

                  This blog is the place to find out all the information and highlights from the classes progress thus so far in the Exhibition. This year’s theme is centered around the Nationality Rooms here at the Cathedral of Learning. The Exhibition theme is The Narrative of the Nationality Rooms: Immigration and Identity in Pittsburgh.  To tackle this theme the class has been split up into different working groups that have their own goals in mind that correlate to the main theme. The working groups are identity, visual knowledge and sacred spaces. Each group has been working diligently in the past few weeks to gather information and research at the archives as well as the Special Collections in the Hillman.

                  In the past week the class has started the second phase of the exhibition, from the research phase to now instillation and getting the gallery ready. We all have now joined additional groups that have different jobs for getting the show ready in the gallery in Frick Fine Arts. Again, we were split up into three different groups to achieve this task. The groups are instillation, documentation and publication. We have made great steps in finalizing certain parts of the show, that being the poster, postcard and the catering, which we all know is the tastiest part of this whole thing!

                  This blog will be updated two to three times a week, one post will be an overall update on the Exhibition and the class.  The other posts will be submitted by students in the class and will discuss something interesting or highlight achievements they themselves have done or want to convey in deeper detail for all to read!

    Categories: 
    • Undergraduate Work
    • Spaces
    • UAG
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    Museum Exhibition Seminar presents Paradoxes of Play!

    Finally, after much hard work, deliberation, investigation, and play ourselves, the Museum Studies Exhibition Seminar class is proud to present our final exhibition, Paradoxes of Play: Conrete and Conceptualist Proposals from Brazil and Beyond! Here are a few pictures from our opening reception this past Friday. Come out and experience it for yourself at the UAG from now until December 9, Monday-Friday 10am-4pm. Also, check back with the blog within the next few weeks to see pictures and hear stories of how the seminar students worked together to install this exhibition.

    Categories: 
    • Undergraduate Work
    • UAG

    Possible exhibition titles

     

    MES: Titles, Objects, and Concepts, Oh My

    In the Museum Exhibition Seminar class this past week, we consolidated what we had been learning about from readings, discussions, and lecturers (including Daniel Quiles and Jessica Gogan) and began to narrow in on what we might like to see in our own exhibit. We noted some specific objects we might like to use, as well as various general concepts, and even a few titles/subtitles.

    Categories: 
    • Undergraduate Work
    • UAG

    Students listen to museum director Lynn Zelevansky

     

    Museum Exhibition Seminar: Behind-the-Scenes at CMoA

    The class got a special treat on an otherwise dreary Monday this week. We met up with museum director Lynn Zelevansky and associate curator Katherine Brodbeck to hear them talk about the intensive process behind creating the upcoming CMoA (and then traveling) exhibit Hélio Oiticica: To Organize Delirium, opening this Saturday, October 1, and running through the end of the year. As Oiticica and his work connect very well to the artists and concepts we've been discussing, this was a great opportunity to start making connections between our readings/discussions and real-world materializations of similar ideas.

    Categories: 
    • Undergraduate Work
    • UAG
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    Museum Exhibition Seminar: Past Themes

    After a successful book-browsing session set up for us by librarian Kate Joranson, the class got to work exploring catalogues of related past exhibitions and conceptual books in more detail, picking out relavant themes, common connections, and interesting language. The class also began thinking about how these past exhibitions can relate to the one we will create. Hint: COLOR.

    Categories: 
    • Undergraduate Work
    • UAG
  • Exhibition poster, designed by Aisling Quigley
     

    Data (after)Lives opens tomorrow!!

    Opening Event: Thursday, September 8th, 4-6pm

    This exhibition incorporates the work and research of Rich Pell (Curator at the Center for PostNatural History), Paul Vanouse, Steve Rowell, Aaron Henderson, and Heather Dewey-Hagborg. Paulina Pardo Gaviria also reinterpets the work of Letícia Parente (1930-1991). Also co-curated by Dr. Alison Langmead, Dr. Josh Ellenbogen, and Isabelle Chartier. Design associates: Aisling Quigley and Jennifer Donnelly. 

    Categories: 
    • Decomposing Bodies
    • Graduate Work
    • Faculty Work
    • UAG
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    Museum Studies Exhibition Seminar Kicks Off!

    This fall's HAA 1020/2020: Museum Studies Exhibition Seminar students began their journey into the world of contemporary Latin American art by exploring the exhibition catalog Open Work and pulling out some terms, phrases, and quotes that stuck out to them.

    Categories: 
    • Undergraduate Work
    • UAG
  • Entering data at my work station in the University Art Gallery

     

    Collective Access: A Fresh View of the UAG

    As a University Art Gallery Intern, I am working to update and standardize the online database system, Collective Access, in conjunction with the old system, Past Perfect, and paper files to create a more comprehensive and accessible database. Additionally, I am creating a Collective Access Data Entry Guide to ensure the system is consistent in the future. This position is very rewarding as it allows me to enrich the resources the UAG offers to art history researchers and to the curious public alike. The breadth of the database is quite extensive, cataloging basic information, physical characteristics, geography/culture, valuation, etc. Of all of these categories, I find the condition reports to be the most fascinating piece of information. Currently, I am working on updating the Nicholas Lochoff Collection, displayed in the Cloister of the Frick Fine Arts building. The resources for this collection are extensive and a very detailed condition report was conducted on several of the pieces in 2002. Physical maintenance was conducted on these pieces in 2003. It is extremely interesting to see both the natural aging of the materials and works as well as the impact of the restoration by comparing the first condition report to the treatment report following the maintenance. This internship has been a fulfilling, educational, and unique capstone to the Museum Studies minor. 

     

    Categories: 
    • Current Projects
    • Academic Interns
    • Undergraduate Work
    • UAG
    • Collecting Knowledge Pittsburgh
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    The Marbles Go to London

    I'm still inputting data about the Elgin Marbles (now we're calling them the 'Parthenon Marbles') into Itinera.  For your intellectual curiosity, let me educate you a little bit about the international controversy that surrounds these ancient marbles statues.

    The artist Phidias sculpted the Parthenon Marbles as decoration for the Parthenon in Athens, Greece between ca. 447 - 438 BCE.  However, although Athens was once a leading city, it diminished into a sketchy, decrepit neighborhood with a far-off a history of grandeur.  By the time Lord Elgin (also known as the ambassador, Thomas Bruce) became interested in the Marbles, Athens was already in tatters.  His interest was sparked by the decorative Marbles, and he told his secretary, William Richard Hamilton, to check out the Marbles in July 1800.  Hamilton also brought along the artist Giovanni Battista Lusieri and a group of other artists to draw the statues at the Acropolis, including the Parthenon Marbles.

    This was all in the early 1800s, when tensions were brewing around Europe because of the Napoleonic Wars.  So in February 1801, Bruce's artists were denied entrace to the Acropolis because of paranoia that the French would attack Turkey after the invasion of Egypt.  Unless Bruce could send a firman, or letter of permission, to the Athenian government allowing the artist to have access to the Marbles, they were finished.

    After some procrastination, Bruce requested a firman at the Porte in Athens, Greece, which became (debatably) official by July 1801.  The firman granted the artists access to the Marbles, and Bruce also threw in a clause stating that the artists had permission to move the Parthenon Marbles from Athens to London, England.

    Next week, I'll post about the controversy that surrounds the Parthenon Marbles.  Stay tuned!

    Categories: 
    • Mobility/Exchange
    • Visual Knowledge
    • Current Projects
    • Itinera
    • Undergraduate Work
    • UAG
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    HAAARCH!!! 2015 Exhibition Map and Schedule

    Edited by Stefan Proost

    Categories: 
    • HAAARCH!!! 2015
    • Undergraduate Work
    • UAG

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