HAAARCH!!! 2014

HAAARCH!!! is a showcase of undergraduate research, creative work, and achievement. This forum provides students the opportunity to exhibit, present and promote their research and experiential learning activities.

The fourth installment of HAAARCH!!!! will take place in the Frick Fine Arts Building on Monday, March 24, 2014.

HAAARCH!!! 2014

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    "St. George Statuette - The Excess of the Reliquary" by DeAnna Robinson

    The Statuette of St. George (1586-97) is one of the many treasures located within the treasury at the Munich Residenz. Commissioned by Duke Wilhelm V of Bavaria in 1586, the statuette was made to contain a relic of St. George and was sent from the Duke’s brother, Archbishop Ernst of Cologne. As a reliquary, the statuette was constructed to convey the story of St. George Slaying the Dragon. St. George was a soldier in the Roman army who was later revered as a Christian martyr and is highly respected. The Eastern Orthodox depiction of the story interprets the dragon as both Satan and the monster of St. George’s life story. The Western version interprets St. George rescuing the princess of Selene from being offered to the dragon and he slays it with the protection of the cross. As a result, the citizens abandon Paganism and convert to Christianity. This paper explores the tension between the statuette as a testament to an unyielding worship towards Saint George and the unavoidable admiration of the extensive wealth with which the reliquary is infused.

    Find out more about DeAnna Robinson.

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    • Undergraduate Work
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    "Chalice of Gourdon" by Laura Dunn

    Located in the Cabinet des Medailles are the chalice and paten found buried at the monastery in Gourdon which is in modern day France. Though we may never know how they made it to Gourdon definitively, it is worthwhile to look into the historical and social implications surrounding these items to understand their meaning more fully. The chalice specifically brings forth many questions as to the nature of the shift from pagan practices to Christianity following the public conversion of King Clovis in 500 AD. Looking for other pieces that relate to the imagery and design on the chalice places the chalice at Gourdon in a specific social and cultural climate. There are also practices of Merovingian and Carolingian gift-giving and burial traditions that work at looking for more ways for these objects to make it to the monastery in Gourdon. The monastery itself also places these items in a time when these establishments are being questioned for their lavishness and opulence. To Bernard of Clairvaux, the use of precious materials and ornate gifts were counter to what monasteries should embody, but to others it also acted as a way for those making pilgrimages to feel like they were closer to interacting with the actual body of Christ. This tension between idolatry and the treasury objects in the Medieval Ages sets the tone for most objects found in these types of situations. The combination of all these ideas culminate in an effort to better understand the chalice and paten of Gourdon that we will likely never fully place.

    Find out more about Laura Dunn.

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    Laura Dunn

    Laura Dunn is a senior double major in History of Art and Architecture and Communication Rhetoric with a minor in Italian. She is originally from Houston, Texas but has thoroughly enjoyed her time in Pittsburgh. She is deeply involved in the Chi Omega fraternity serving as the past president. She traveled with the HAA department to Cleveland and Detroit the past fall and was inspired by what she learned there. Coming into college, Laura didn’t expect that she would be an HAA major but after her first semester taking Introduction to World Art with Gretchen Bender she was hooked. She is proud and honored to be a part of such a distinguished department and will be extremely sad to leave Pitt when she graduates.

    Laura is presenting her paper, "Chalice of Gourdon" at HAAARCH!!! 2014.

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    Chris Hazel

    Chris Hazel is a student in his fifth year at the University of Pittsburgh studying Architectural Studies-Design and Civil Engineering. Throughout his five years at the university, Chris has participated as a teaching assistant in multiple classes and is currently a research assistant with Professor Mina Rajagopalan. He has also participated in several local, national, and international design competitions including the Imagine Art and Urban Connectivity competition where he won second place in summer of 2012. He has also been active in the Pitt AIAS chapter—serving as a board member in the 2012-13 school year and currently leads educational workshops for the program. For the past 8 months, Chris has also worked as an intern architect at Renaissance 3 Architects in the South Side. Over the past school year, Chris has been pursuing his independent research as part of his honors thesis. Chris's research deals with space and architecture as a way of defining social hierarchy. Through examples of contemporary architecture and his own design, Chris is hoping to find the connection between physical form and social definition by way of defining an architecture of equality that stands for the society as well as the individual. 

    Chris will be presenting his paper, "Re-Thinking Architecture: A Call for a New Social Space" at HAAARCH!!! 2014. He will also be presenting his Senior Design Studio Portfolio.

     

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    "Embodiment and Decoration: Henri Matisse's Rosary Chapel in Vence, France" by Lauren Burgess

    Although Henri Matisse’s Rosary Chapel in Vence, France was completed when the artist was 82 years old, it was the first piece the painter referred to as his “masterpiece.” Despite its prestige within Matisse’s extensive body of work, the chapel is minimally discussed in comparison to many of his paintings. Thus far the art historical community has framed the discussion of the Rosary Chapel in Vence France in two ways: as a result of the famed elderly artist’s long career in painting and as a space containing isolated works of art to be examined stagnantly and separately. Neither of these approaches are representative of the real significance of the Chapel space. The Chapel is an inhabitable architectural space and the design includes temporal non-fixed elements, in addition to elements fixed to walls and floors. Because of its multifunctional active human use and the nature of its design, it is vital to consider the Chapel as a space in which interactions amongst people, modern art, and ritual occur. This contemporary Catholic worship site is a whole work that acts as the setting for religious rituals and tourist rituals.

    This presentation will examine how artifacts of religious worship created by a modern artist and human participants are able to engage in both religious and tourist rituals of Matisse’s Chapel. This involves both when the nuns, costumed priest, and parishioners engage with the space as a tool of their religious ritual worship and when non-religious visitors attend the space for a fee to experience the work of Henri Matisse. In the later moment the function of the Chapel shifts away from the artist’s intent and its religious purpose to accommodate its popularity as a work of art. This analysis will employ my personal experience in the chapel space, writings of Matisse and his collaborators, and visual documentation of the chapel to argue that the Chapel truly functions in a complex way that differs from the previously put forth narratives. 

    Find out more about Lauren Burgess.

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    • HAAARCH!!! 2014
    • Undergraduate Work
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    Lauren Burgess

    Lauren Burgess is a senior majoring in HAA and Communication Rhetoric with a Studio Arts minor. Lauren has been an active on Pitt’s campus both in academic pursuits and student organizations.  In the spring of 2013 Lauren received a Small Grant from the Office of Undergraduate Research to travel to New York City to conduct research for her honor thesis. She later participated in the interdisciplinary Brackenridge Summer Research Program with the University Honors College in pursuit of turning her honors thesis into a Bachelors of Philosophy paper. She studied abroad in Paris, France continuing her research of a Chapel in France with on-site visits. While finishing up her Bachelors of Philosophy she is also engaged in the Encounters: Art in the City Assistantship. Outside of HAA Lauren is the vice president of the National Society of Collegiate Scholars at the University of Pittsburgh and was an executive board member, choreographer and dancer for the Pitt Dance Ensemble.

    Lauren will be presenting her paper "Embodiment and Decoration: Henri Matisse's Rosary Chapel in Vence, France” at HAAARCH!!! 2014. She  will also be presenting as part of the group presentation "Encounters: Art in the City."

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    "Curating Minimalism at the Carnegie Museum of Art" by James DiBitetto

    In many respects, the scholarly history of Minimalism, an artistic movement beginning in the 1960s that focused on the creation of reductive art, is quite extensive. Much is written about the formal qualities of Minimalist works as well as their production. Despite this, not much focus has been paid to the reception of these works, and almost no focus has been directed toward the display and curation of Minimalist art. My paper will use the Minimalism display at the Carnegie Museum of Art in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania as a case study to address and better understand the display and curation of Minimalist art objects.

    At the Carnegie Museum, I have experienced three distinct, charged episodes of Minimalism display. These three displays revolve heavily around three separate decisions made by the curators of the 2013 Carnegie International, a large-scale exhibition currently on display at the museum. The first curatorial decision, the choice to disassemble the previous Minimalism gallery, highlights the first of the three aforementioned Minimalism episodes, the self-contained, Minimalist-focused gallery that was in place prior to the International. In conjunction with the decision to break up the Minimalism gallery, the second key decision made by the curators was to display the Minimalist works among artworks of different styles and time periods, leading to the Minimalism episode currently on display at the museum. In order to experience the third of the charged Minimalism episodes, we must move just outside the museum, where Phyllida Barlow’s Tip is in direct interaction with Richard Serra’s Carnegie, a sculpture that has been standing, undisturbed, since the 1985 Carnegie International. Having studied these three charged episodes extensively through personal experience as well as observations of how others approach the spaces, I, in this paper, will critically assess the curatorial decisions involving Minimalism made for the 2013 Carnegie International. My goal is to elaborate on the major successes and failures of each episode of display, allowing me to therefore assess the decisions made for the exhibition. I will focus particularly on the way in which the display fosters the Minimalist works it contains as well as the way the display imbues a sense of curatorial meaning and purpose with regard to the exhibition as a whole. 

    Find out more about James DiBitetto.

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    • HAAARCH!!! 2014
    • Undergraduate Work
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    "Learning Through Teaching: Answering the Question of Why Art History Matters" by Daniel Augenbraun

    In the fall of 2013 I received word of a program called Encounters: Art in the City. I, along with four other art history majors, signed on to teach this pilot program at the local magnet school, Pittsburgh Science and Technology Academy (SciTech). By visiting local Oakland public artworks such as the Stephen Foster Memorial and Richard Serra’s Carnegie, as well as participating in interactive classroom activities, the group of high school students will leave this course with a greater understanding of the art that surrounds them. One of the program’s main goals is to help get us closer to the answer to the question, “why does art history matter?”

    By using Encounters as a case study, I plan to evaluate this program and allow it to act as the template upon which I create another similar program that can be implemented in another public high school. Throughout the course of Encounters, I will analyze the various activities and lessons, looking specifically at ways in which I can make improvements for a more successful future course. Ultimately, the information I gather will aid in my tailoring of a program that will work to both introduce a group of high school students to art in their city, as well as bring me closer to an answer to the question of “why does art history matter?”

    Find out more about Danny Augenbraun.

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    • Undergraduate Work
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    "Study of Senses Culminating in Religious Experience for the Hours of Jeanne d'Evreux" by Allison Reitz

    The Hours of Jeanne d’Evreux is a book of hours designed between 1324 and 1328 CE specifically for Queen Jeanne d’Evreux, wife of King Charles IV of France. It was intended as a prayer book for Jeanne’s private use which is supported by the handheld size (3 ½ by 2 ½ inches). The visual interaction with the images, symbols and text that gave instructions to Jeanne will be researched. I will explore the use of sight, touch and sound that Jeanne d’Evreux may have experienced and how these senses may have enhanced the reading and religious experience she may have underwent. While the book is a physical object, it served to elevate Jeanne to a higher spiritual realm.  To gain an understanding of the sensory experience, the context will be explored along with the illustrations that serve as an instruction to Jeanne. 

    Find out more about Allison Reitz.

     

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    • HAAARCH!!! 2014
    • Undergraduate Work
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    Senior Design Studio Portfolio: Mitchell Stein

    The portfolio is known to be the collection of a student’s work throughout their undergraduate, graduate, or professional career. When I look at mine, it is a reminder of the all the thought, the trial and errors, the strategies, and the programming that it took to create such work. Each page of my portfolio is a chapter of my time here at Pitt in the Architectural Studies program. The portfolio itself was even designed in a specific manner to portray the amount of processing necessary for such projects to be a success.

    Find out more about Mitchell Stein.

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    • Undergraduate Work

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