HAAARCH!!! 2014

HAAARCH!!! is a showcase of undergraduate research, creative work, and achievement. This forum provides students the opportunity to exhibit, present and promote their research and experiential learning activities.

The fourth installment of HAAARCH!!!! will take place in the Frick Fine Arts Building on Monday, March 24, 2014.

HAAARCH!!! 2014

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    Mitchell Stein

    My name is Mitchell Stein and I am a senior, Architectural Studies major with a minor in Studio Arts. I’m 21 years old and a native to the great city of Pittsburgh. I am a member of The Delta Chi Fraternity here on Pitt’s campus, which I have been a part of since my freshman year. Architecture has always been my passion; since I was a young boy, I played with any sort of toy that allowed me to design and build something. My mother was an interior designer here in Pittsburgh, and I used to come to her office at the firm, Astorino, and wander off to find the architects. Like my mother, pursuing her career choice was more than an interest, it was a true passion. My commitment to architecture has continued to grow throughout my life; my time at Pitt has fostered my interest even further. I plan to purse my Masters in Architecture (M.Arch) this fall.

    Mitchell will be presenting his Senior Design Studio Portfolio at HAAARCH!!! 2014.

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    "Painting with Light: The Composite World War 1 Photography of Frank Hurley" by Stephanie Selya

    Australian WWI photographer Frank Hurley was hired to record the events of WWI for the Australian Imperial Force (AIF). Better known for his photographs of the Endurance expedition into Antarctica, Hurley’s photographic recordings of WWI have generally been overlooked. Experiencing war firsthand, he felt that he could not accurately represent the war without being permitted to make composite photographs, images derived from multiple photographic negatives. His feelings on this topic were so strong that he tendered his resignation dependent on that allowance. His reasoning, and his photographs, can be used to shed light on the bigger issues of WWI representations, and on the limits and possibilities of the photographic medium at the time.

    The history of the making of composite photographic images relates to the methods of pictorialism, and nineteenth century trends of art photography. Yet, Hurley was hired to make photojournalistic images, at the opposite end of the photographic spectrum. Experimenting in the late nineteenth century, photographers wanted photography to be on the same artistic hierarchical level as painting, and so they manipulated their images to appear more compositionally similar to painting. Perhaps the most well-known figure in the world of art photography, O.G. Rejlander’s work can be used as a model for understanding the possible intentions behind the work of Hurley. While this was celebrated at the time as the proper way to fit photography into the canon of art history, the 1920s saw a radical change in ideals, causing this kind of art photography to be seen as indecent.

    Considering Hurley’s diaries from the war, research on the nature and history of composite photography, and visual data from two of his WWI composite photographs, the tensions surrounding the visual knowledge associated with making composite prints can be explored. These pressures existing between Hurley’s desire to create images which gave an impression of the war, and to record the events of the war as he was hired to do can be fleshed out to show an alteration in the discussion surrounding photography as an artistic medium. Hurley’s choice to make composite photographs of his experiences during WWI, combined with discussions surrounding the purpose and uses of photography can create a new dialogue centering on the understanding and conception of photography’s functioning within the setting of WWI.

    Find out more about Stephanie Selya.

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    Jamie Falco

    Jamie Falco graduated from the University of Pittsburgh in December with a dual degree in Architectural Studies and Business, accompanied by a minor in Economics and Italian. Jamie has held various internships throughout her time at the University, including working with Passive House certified architects and a large home staging company in Rome, Italy. Upon graduation Jamie returned to Philadelphia where she is doing visual design for West Elm, but plans to move into advertising with one of the larger creative agencies on the east coast. She is looking forward to taking a year off from school before returning to obtain her masters degree. 

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    Danica Cooper

    Danica Cooper will graduate with honors this spring from the anthropology department with a concentration in physical anthropology, a certificate in African studies, and a minor in museum studies. She came to Pitt with experience in student teaching and has continued to do so in Swahili language classes. She has always been interested in music, and is the Equipment and Facilities Operations Manager and Transcription Specialist for Pitt’s first show choir. She became interested in African music and is now the President of the African Music and Dance Club. She has obtained internships both at the University Art Gallery and a locally-owned art gallery. She is also a member of the Outside the Classroom Curriculum Honorary Society. After graduation, she is accepting a part-time position with an African music and dance company and plans to pursue a position with a museum of natural history.

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    FlorenceFive Stays Another Night

    The past couple days have been quite busy! On Wednesday, we visited the abbey church of S. Godenzo to study its structure as a comparison to the destroyed S. Reparata. We also took a tour through gardens and the Bernard Berenson collection at The Harvard Center for Italian Renaissance Studies, Villa I Tatti. We were greeted graciously with tea and cookies as Professor Toker presented some materials for archive at the center. Yesterday, we enjoyed a free day around Florence, spending hours in the Bargello, Palazzo Pitti, and Uffici Gallery, and we took in the view down the Arno on Ponte Vecchio.

    Our early wake up for a day of travel today led to a flight cancellation by 6:00am. Kindly, the airline set us up at the Hilton Florence Metropole, and we've had a relaxing day of rest before we're Pittsburgh bound again tomorrow by 4:00am. Here's a pic of us on Thursday evening in front of the Duomo.

    USA, here we come!

    -The FlorenceFive

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    FlorenceFive Catches the Train

    Yesterday, we ran for the train and made it just in time to get to Lucca.  We explored the crypt under the Church of San Michele in Foro and the Pergamo di Giovanni Pisano in the Lucca Duomo.  Afterwards, we visited Pisa to look at the pulpit in the Duomo and to compare the Pisa Baptistery to the baptistery we examined in Florence. This photo is the front facade of the Church of San Michele in Foro.

    -TheFlorenceFive

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    FlorenceFive Underground

    Today, we went to the excavation site under the Florence Cathedral to examine and photograph the various mosaic carpet patterns. Then, we explored San Lorenzo and the Biblioteca Medicea Laurenziana designed by Michelangelo. We concluded the day by examining the ancient roman foundation existing beneath the baptistery in Florence as well as the foundation of what Professor Toker believes is an earlier baptistery building.

    Ciao for now!!

    -The FlorenceFive

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    FlorenceFive Has Landed

    After flights from Pitt to Detroit and Detroit to Amsterdam, our venture to Florence took a slight shift, landing us in Bologna around 1:00pm today. Foggy skies, a bustling airport, and a tiny rental Fiat in which to pack our luggage tight could not hold this team back from making our dinner reservation at Acquacotta for our first traditional Italian meal in Florence. Up early tomorrow to spend the day under S. Maria del Fiore and the Baptistery!

    -The FlorenceFive

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    "The Nature of the High Line: A Jacobsian Perspective on New York's 'Park in the Sky'" by Julia Warren

    Environmental philosopher Ingrid Stefanovic believes today’s cities fail to foster an awareness of the interconnection among humans, their settlements, and the natural world. She envisions a new city that preserves moments of spectacle capable of showing urbanites that their past and present routines and contributions are not isolated from, but an essential part of, the world’s ecology.   

    The High Line, a public park on Manhattan’s gentrified west side, has been recognized as a space that frames these moments in Stefanovic’s proposed natural city. The park is thought to preserve a part of New York’s industrial past by repurposing a 1930s viaduct, is noted as offering a glimpse at the beauty and vigor of the natural world through planting design, and is seen as a place where one can slow his or her pace and take in the consummate surroundings.

    Just as cities cannot exist in isolation from their surroundings, however, the High Line cannot exist in isolation from social and historical contexts. Given these contexts, the operations of the park exclude portions of the public and perpetuate the homogenization of its surroundings. Moreover, the designed and manicured landscape pays no respect to the natural processes that had once laid claim to the space. Unfortunately, the moment has passed for the High Line to escape these shortcomings.

    Find out more about Julia Warren.

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    "Tracey Emin's My Bed as Creative Space" by Kelsey Kresse

    In the almost two decades since Tracey Emin premiered My Bed, it has largely been interpreted as being purely autobiographical (as has most of her work) and simply part of her “bad sex aesthetic.” This paper contends that upon closer examination, Emin’s work is more than bad sex and dirty sheets but can bee seen as a creative space for both Emin and other artists. If Emin’s piece can be seen as a center of creativity then it shows promising connections to the true creative space that is never part of the visual representations of Ovid’s Pygmalion Myth, the bed itself. Although the Ovid text clearly places the moment of Galatea’s transformation in Pygmalion’s bed, subsequent representations of the myth in Western art are almost exclusively set in his studio. I argue that Emin’s 1998 installation piece can be read as the physical incarnation of the essential element of the myth omitted by most artists. The bed is the center of creation for both Emin and Pygmalion. The resulting comparison of Emin’s work and the Ovid narrative produces compelling and powerful consequences that cannot be ignored. 

    Find out more about Kelsey Kresse.

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