HAAARCH!!! 2015

HAAARCH!!! is a yearly showcase of undergraduate research, creative work, and achievement. This forum provides students the opportunity to exhibit, present and promote their research and experiential learning activities.

HAAARCH!!! 2015 will take place in the Cloister and University Art Gallery of the Frick Fine Arts Building on March 23, from 4-6 pm.

HAAARCH!!! 2015

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    Matthew Sova

    Matthew Sova is a senior History of Art and Architecture and Anthropology double major at the University of Pittsburgh.  He is currently completing an undergraduate honors thesis on the Ottonian convent church of Saint Cyriakus in Gernrode, Germany, under the mentorship of Professor Shirin Fozi.  Due to the generosity of the Friends of Frick Fine Arts and the Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences Office of the Associate Dean, he traveled to Germany in Spring 2015 to complete his research on this site.  He was awarded the Milton Fine Museum Professional Fellowship for the 2014-2015 academic year, and works at the Society for Contemporary Craft under Executive Director Janet McCall. He was also a member of the Brackenridge Fellowship in Summer 2014.  Matthew has interned at the American Jewish Museum in Squirrel Hill; participated in an archaeological excavation of a Civil War prison camp on Johnson’s Island, Ohio; conducted research on Florence Cathedral with Professor Franklin Toker; been an undergraduate teaching assistant for Introduction to World Art; and assisted in two separate Museum Studies Seminars.  After graduation, he hopes to continue his education in medieval art and architecture.

    Matthew will give a presentation entitled "Women and Empore: The Issue of Gendered Space in Ottonian Architecture," at HAAARCH 2015. 

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    Austin Gehman

    Austin Gehman is a senior at the University of Pittsburgh, majoring in Architectural Studies.  Throughout his four years at the university, Austin has participated as a teaching assistant in multiple classes, participated in HAAARCH three times, and designed the promotional materials for HAAARCH.  He also studied abroad in the fall of 2013 in Copenhagen, Denmark where he explored themes and styles of Scandinavian and European architecture.  He is also a senior representative of the Pitt chapter of AIAS and a member of Delta Tau Delta Fraternity.  Outside of the university, Austin has worked in several professional offices including Front Studio Architects in Pittsburgh and T2TheS Design-Build in St Petersburg, FL.  He has also worked as a tour guide at Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater for the past three summers.  Austin plans to pursue a Master of Architecture degree following a gap year during which he hopes to gain experience in an architecture or design firm. 

    Austin will present his portfolio as a selected architectural studies senior at HAAARCH 2015. 

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    "Faces of Empire: Social Discourse of Field Marshal, 1st Baron, Sir Jeffery Amherst's Portraits Created in Life" by Jonathon T. Weber

    During his life, 1717 to 1797, Lord Amherst was and continues to be a controversial figure for his military exploits which expanded the reach of Britain’s Empire. Historians and his peers have equally criticized these endeavors for decimating Woodland Indian communities and provoking insurrections in America and Europe. In this paper I will explore how this morally complicated individual is identified and remembered in portraiture.

    There are dozens of known portraits of Amherst and they have few consistent characteristics, despite being made while he was a living reference. Each portrait exhibits many different features to identify as an archetypical hero, villain, or advocate. These identities will be compared to see how their environment influences their memory when related to representative works of art which manifest these identities.

    This study will focus on the formal analysis of three works which will be supplemented with historical research on this period. The first work will be a painting by Sir Joshua Reynolds in 1765. This painting is important because it has been the subject of frequent study to have developed its own legacy in Amherst’s memory for his acts of heroism. It is popular for its own merits and provenance and also because of its distinctly politically observant audience of intent. The next object is a humble print by an unknown artist Lord Amherst on Duty made in 1780. This is a very important print because of its uniquely exaggerated features, gore, and social criticism which portrays Amherst as a sadistic villain. An object such as this is mass produced and easily available, making it perfect for an audience of the general public. The final object is a very unusual and rare cameo by Isaac Gosset in 1760. This is an incredibly important object because it depicts Amherst in intricate detail as both a soldier and noble who would act as honorable advocate to his subordinates. Cameos have long been associated with statecraft but they had developed to offer a private viewer an intimate portrait to remember someone they love.

    The portraits’ complementary differences in: medium, composition, audience, patronage, and agency present a comprehensive vision of a man who was among the most influential figures in the 18th century yet remains an unknown. This apparent divergence in Amherst’s military portraits suggests a broader insecurity in imperial and colonial life in which an individual’s identity and memory are socially predetermined and beyond their control.

    Find out more about Jonathon T. Weber here

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    Jonathon T. Weber

    Jonathon T. Weber is a graduating 2015 senior in the Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences in the History of Arts and Architecture.  Despite a strong background in finance, he discontinued this to focus his studies exclusively in art history. He has experience interning in many local galleries and museums as well as studying abroad in Krakow,Poland.  Among his proudest achievements was being awarded the Office of Undergraduate Research’s 2014 London Field Studies program in order to work on his research project. Jonathon is currently working on an independent research project:  “Faces of Empire: Social Discourse of Field Marshal, 1st Baron, Sir Jeffery Amherst's Portraits Created in Life,” under the direction of Dr. Kirk Savage.  He is currently employed locally with Concept Art Gallery and plans to enroll in the CMU program for Master in Arts Management in the near future.

    Jonathon will be presenting his research project, "“Faces of Empire: Social Discourse of Field Marshal, 1st Baron, Sir Jeffery Amherst's Portraits Created in Life" at HAAARCH 2015. 

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