Biographies

  •  

    Caroline Fazzini

    Caroline Fazzini is a sophomore at the University of Pittsburgh, pursuing degrees in the History of Art and Architecture and Studio Arts along with a minor in Museum Studies. During the Fall 2015 semester she served as an Undergraduate Teaching Assistant for Intro to Modern Art. This semester she has been awarded a funded fellowship and is currently working on a research project with the help of a graduate mentor that focuses on the role of narcissism in the work of artist Hannah Wilke. Caroline is also interning at the Carnegie Museums of Art and Natural History working on a project dealing with visitor evaluation of a recent exhibition. Caroline, along with two other interns will be presenting this internship project at HAAARCH. After graduating from Pitt, Caroline plans to attend grad school and eventually have a career in a museum in either curation or art education.

    Categories: 
    • HAAARCH!!! 2016
    • Undergraduate Work
    Tags: 
  •  

    Leslie Rose

    Leslie Rose is in her third year at Pitt, majoring in the History of Art and Architecture with a minor in Museum Studies. She intends on graduating spring of next year. Leslie is deeply interested in Modern and Contemporary art well as diversity and representation in the art world. After she graduates, she hopes to continue her studies then one day work as a curator in a museum. Her goal is to improve the visibility of women and minorities in museums so that a variety of stories and experiences are told.

    As the archival scholar for the Frick Fine Arts Library, Leslie is currently researching the library’s amazing collection of artists’ books. An artist book is a work of art that often mimics the form a book. With her research, she is making the collection more accessible to faculty and students by creating searchable metadata. The information Leslie collects also allows her to make recommendations on artists' books the library should acquire to ensure that the collection is representative and diverse. 

    Categories: 
    • HAAARCH!!! 2016
    • Undergraduate Work
    Tags: 
  •  

    Linda Lee

    Linda Lee is a senior in Architectural Studies with a minor in Studio Arts and will be graduating this Spring. Throughout her undergraduate years at Pitt, she has been active in the HAA department as a teaching assistant for the Foundation Studio course and in the student body as the Media Relations Director for Pitt's chapter of AIAS.

    Her main interests lie in the movement through and between spaces as well as the influences of these pathways on a user's behaviors and perceptions. For the past year, she has been working in the bicycle/pedestrian office of the Dpt of City Planning, aiding with creating bike/ped networks throughout the city, chiefly downtown. This has challenged her to consider movement at a much larger scale and has also lead her to discover her interest in urban design. Following a gap year in which she hopes to gain further experience through an architecture or design firm, Linda plans to pursue a Master of Architecture degree. She also hopes to further pursue her interest in urban design.

    In previous years, Linda has presented her Foundation Studio Design project and an installation she created with her classmates. At HAAARCH!!! 2016, she will be presenting her senior architecture/design portfolio as well as a Design Competition Project she submitted for her Built Environment Course. 

    Categories: 
    • HAAARCH!!! 2016
    • Undergraduate Work
    Tags: 
  •  

    Paige Anderson

    Paige Anderson is a senior at the University of Pittsburgh who will be graduating this April with a major in Architectural Studies and a double minor in Studio Art and Economics. She recently retired from the Pitt Track and Field/Cross Country Teams and started working at local architecture firm, R3A.  She plans on going to graduate school for a Masters of Sustainable Urban Design and would like to eventually pursue a PhD. She loves Pittsburgh and travelling anywhere. Her research in Hong Kong this past summer in pursuit of her Honors Thesis research project has been life-changing and she is grateful to all her professors, especially Prof. Rajagopalan. 

    Categories: 
    • HAAARCH!!! 2016
    • Undergraduate Work
    Tags: 
  •  

    Ashley Funyak

    Ashley Funyak is a junior, double-majoring in Anthropology and Communications with a minor in Museum Studies, and expects to graduate in April 2017. Ashley is currently a marketing intern at Society for Contemporary Craft and serves as Program Director at WPTS Radio, the University of Pittsburgh’s student-run radio station. She enjoys volunteering with non-profit arts organizations and hopes to work in this field after graduation. She is also interested in learning more about museum education and art management. Ashley will be presenting on her experience in HAA 1020: Museum Studies Exhibition Seminar during the Fall 2015 semester, where she assisted with the exhibition “Exposure: Black Voices in the Arts” at HAARCH 2016. 

    Categories: 
    • HAAARCH!!! 2016
    • Undergraduate Work
    Tags: 
  •  

    Meghan Hipple

    Meghan is a graduating senior majoring in the History of Art and Architecture and minoring in Museum Studies. In the past, she has been the recipient of Honors College’s Brackenridge Summer Research Fellowship and the Office of Undergraduate Research’s Summer Research Award. Last semester, Meghan studied abroad in London at Richmond University where she took classes on film and visual culture.

    Meghan is interested in how different medias affect a viewer’s understanding and relationship with images. She is interested in digital media and contemporary film and television and how different kinds of screens and digitization change how we relate to images. She is also interested in the effects of social media, like Instagram, Tumblr and Ello in how we manipulate and exhibit images. Currently, she is working on an Honors Thesis that mixes these interests with her concern with environmental issues.

    At HAAARCH, she will talk about how viewer relationships with American landscape imagery in contemporary televisual representation is tied to how American landscape paintings and panoramas were experienced in the 19th century. It is a project that brings together spectator theory and apparatus theory with her interest in discourse and knowledge formation.

    After graduation in May, Meghan will work in the Education Department at the Carnegie Museum of Art as a Camp Instructor, sharing her passion for art, museums and teaching with students of different ages. In the future, she plans to pursue her PhD in Visual Culture Studies.

     

    Categories: 
    • HAAARCH!!! 2016
    • Undergraduate Work
    Tags: 
  •  

    Grace Strong

    Grace Strong is a senior who will be graduating this spring with a double major in History of Art & Architecture and Italian Studies, and certificate in Medieval & Renaissance studies. After graduation Grace hopes to pursue a career in development for an art museum, or cultural institution, encouraged by the various internships she has had with the Carnegie Museum of Art, Heinz History Center, and British Institute of Florence.

    Grace has focused on Italian history and art history during her time at Pitt, which has been reflected in her research interests of cultural exchange and current status of art historical discourse. Her thesis work this spring focuses on the gaps in art historical discourse due to the disparity in research on artists other than the “masters” from various locales away from Florence, Rome, or Venice. Her background in Italian literature, semester spent in Florence, and fellowship received for this current semester has all supported her research. With the Humanities and Social Sciences Graduate Research Seminar Fellowship Grace has enrolled in the graduate renaissance art seminar course this semester, engaging with graduate students on various art theories that have provided a more encompassing understanding for her research topic.

    At HAAARCH Grace will deliver a talk on 15th century Italian artist, Carlo Crivelli. Neglected from important historical texts, like Vasari’s Lives of the Artists, this talk will highlight the unique style Crivelli honed in the isolated east coast region of Italy and the impact he had on other artists from the area.

     

     

     

    Categories: 
    • HAAARCH!!! 2016
    • Undergraduate Work
    Tags: 
  •  

    Melissa Quarto

    Melissa Quarto will be graduating this April with a double major in History of Art & Architecture and Hispanic Languages & Literature with minors in Museum Studies and Studio Arts.  She is primarily interested in the political agency of images and place-making through transnational encounters within the Americas. At HAAARCH, she will present her Honors thesis, Performing Incanismo: Cultural Tourism at Machu Picchu, Peru. In addition, she will share her experience developing Exposure: Black Voices in the Arts, exhibited at the University Art Gallery this past fall.

    Her Honors Thesis questions the contemporary use of Inka imagery and monumental architecture by federal agencies in Peru to construct a national identity, and concurrently promote an idealized image of Peru marketable to an international tourist public. The Friends of the Frick Research Award has allowed her to travel to Peru in early March to observe the constructed tourist pilgrimage from Cusco, through the Sacred Valley, and culminating at the iconic site of Machu Picchu. This past summer Melissa was able to travel to London through the Image & Word Field Studies program to conduct research on the methods of display national art institutions utilize to present non-Western cultures. During this trip she was able to briefly visit the UNESCO Archives in Paris, France, where she came across documents by the UNESCO organization warning the Peruvian government of the ecological stress on the Machu Picchu site due to its exhaustive overuse by tourists. This opportunity, along with her past coursework in History of Ethics and Collecting and her studies in the Spanish department, prompted her to focus this site for her Honors Thesis research.

    A teaching assistantship for Museum Studies Exhibition Seminar this past semester, which presented Exposure: Black Voices in the Arts, allowed Melissa to share her interests in exhibition development and design and her enthusiasm for socially engaged art with her peers. Her experience at the Society for Contemporary Craft this academic year, thanks to the Frick Fine Arts Award, gave her a crucial opportunity to further develop skills in communications and exhibition planning geared towards community engagement. After graduation she hopes to work in Manhattan at an art gallery, auction house, or design firm for a few years before deciding what studies to pursue for a masters degree. Ideally, she hopes to find a career and course of study that will allow her to combine her interests in both Latin America and the visual arts, while further developing her knowledge or Spanish. 

    Categories: 
    • HAAARCH!!! 2016
    • Undergraduate Work
    Tags: 
  •  

    Emily Mirales

    Emily Mirales will be graduating this spring with majors in the History of Art & Architecture and Anthropology along with a minor in Museum Studies. As a dual major studying art and archaeology, Emily has developed an interest in material culture studies and the interactions that occur between people, objects, and places. Last summer, she worked in the Decorative Arts and Design Department of the Carnegie Museum of Art as a Milton Fine Museum Professions Fellow, assisting with various tasks related to the exhibition Silver to Steel: The Modern Design of Peter Muller-Munk. She has continued working with the Decorative Arts Department as an intern. Last spring, she worked as a collections management intern in the University Art Gallery, helping to standardize and expand database entries and catalog works on campus. Emily's  career goals are in the museum field and her internship experiences have increased her interest in collections management and curatorial work. She has also served as an undergraduate teaching assistant for Introduction to World Art and the Museum Studies Exhibition Seminar. 

    Currently, Emily is researching the United States Botanic Garden and its development throughout the 19th century. As part of this project Emily travelled to Washington D.C. with funding from a Friends of the Frick Fine Arts Research Award, enabling her to conduct archival research at the Library of Congress, the Smithsonian Institution Archives, and archives held by the Architect of the Capitol. The focus of her honors thesis will be the intended educational goals of the garden, how people were able to interact with the space, and how it was depicted in period prints, photographs, magazines, and newspapers.

    Categories: 
    • HAAARCH!!! 2016
    • Undergraduate Work
    Tags: 
  •  

    Brianna Humbert

    Brianna Humbert is a senior majoring in the History of Art & Architecture with a minor in French language. Her research focuses on women artists and often takes on a feminist perspective. She is interested in a range of topics in modern and contemporary art, including identity, performance, collective art projects, and feminist art of the 1970s. Brianna is currently working on an honors thesis project on the work of contemporary artist Sheryl Oring, specifically her performance titled “I Wish to Say,” (2004 – present). In this work, Oring travels to public places dressed as a 1960s secretary, sets up a desk area with a banner announcing the art project complete with a vintage typewriter, and asks passersby to dictate a message to a political figure, which she consequently sends. Utilizing the image of the secretary and an analysis of Oring’s performance, the thesis will provide a feminist reading of how the stereotype is employed. The paper explores the research question: does the nostalgic secretarial persona empower Oring in her mission to provide agency through her performance or does the artist succumb to the stereotype?

    During her time at the University of Pittsburgh, Brianna has been a volunteer at the Mattress Factory Museum of Contemporary Art, and a research assistant at the University Art Gallery. She has also participated in the Museum Studies Exhibition Seminar, helping to curate and install the fall 2015 exhibition Exposure: Black Voices in the Arts. In February of 2016, she received funding from the Friends of the Frick Fine Arts Research Award to travel to Washington DC where she met and interviewed Sheryl Oring. While there, she observed and engaged in the artist’s ongoing participatory art project, “I Wish to Say.”

    Brianna will be presenting this research at HAAARCH as well as at the annual Gender, Sexuality, and Women’s Studies conference in April. She hopes to devote more time to researching contemporary women artists through graduate study, eventually leading to a career as a professor of art history

    Categories: 
    • HAAARCH!!! 2016
    • Undergraduate Work
    Tags: 

Pages