Digital Preservation

  • Coggle Mind-Map of Sustaining MedArt Bibliography

    Mind-Map of Sustaining MedArt Bibliography

     

    Creating a Bibliography for Sustaining MedArt

    The process for creating a bibliography for the Sustaining Medart project began with looking at a mashup of keywords and themes from the grant application of the project, and of course discussions in the Visual Media Workshop with Aisling Quigley, and having been involved in the interviews that we carried out for the project at the International Congress of Medieval Studies in Kalamazoo, MI.  Websites, PDFs, and journal articles worked themselves out of the woodwork as I searched for terms such as “preserving websites”, “digital preservation policy”, “website usability”, “digital collections”, “digital galleries”, “online museums”, “digital image collection users”, “grounded theory”, “qualitative coding”, “coding interviews”, “analyzing interviews”, “1990s websites”, and more. Eventually I had to figure out how to make sense of it all; how to put all of these resources in a logical order.  

    The major themes that I found throughout the articles, which turned into categories and sub-categories within the bibliography, include the following: Usability, with the sub-categories Aesthetics and another for Metadata, User Perspective; Image Databases and Collections, with the sub-category of Issues in the 1990s; Preservation and Access, with the sub-categories of Images, Websites, Policy/Policy Development, and Project Management; and Grounded Theory, with the sub-category of Coding and Analyzing Interviews. 

    Usability was an obvious one. While carrying out the interviews, the biggest aspect we focused on was testing how usable people found the website; whether they could intuitively find what was asked of them to find. Regardless of opinion, the task that they had to complete was more about the logical navigation of the website. The resources that I gathered for this section and its subsections include articles and books on the functionality of digital materials for research in the humanities, how individuals experience and react to digital archives and museums, how viewers react to the quality of images, and the user perspective, interaction, and understanding of metadata found in digital image collections. I’ve invested a lot of time in the Usability section due to its prominence within the interview process. 

    The second section that I’ve spent the most time on thus far is Preservation and Access. When searching for articles and trying to find relevant sources for Sustaining MedArt, the majority fell into the category of preservation policy and scholarly advice on how to develop that policy. With any digital preservation project, developing a preservation policy is very important, especially if new individuals become involved later down the road. The sub-category for Websites contains some important case studies for website preservation, including a case study on preserving the Lighthouses of Australia website, and a reference to preserving two HTML exhibition websites created by the MoMA.

    My thinking behind placing Coding and Analyzing Interviews as a sub-category of Grounded Theory is that coding and analyzing interviews, which are qualitative and opinion-based in nature, fall under Grounded Theory as a research model. Grounded Theory as a larger category is one that I still have to do some further reading on in order to add to the category within the bibliography. 

    *Mind-map made using Coggle

    Categories: 
    • Sustaining DH
    • Sustaining MedArt
  •  

    Itinera Got An Upgrade

    We reworked Itinera because it was glitching on some tour stops for agents.  Now that it's been updated, all the tour stops are functioning, and it looks a lot nicer.  This is great because coincidentally, my FE-R presentation is next week.

    Today, I finished up all the goals that we were trying to achieve with inputting the Parthenon Marbles into Itinera.  All the sculptures are linked to each other, the people are linked to each other and (hopefully) I inputted all the relevant data.  I've done a lot of mouse-clicking in the past couple months, and I'm happy that we've been able to complete so much for this project!

    Next week, I'll be able to go back into Itinera and fix anything that I missed.  I'm relieved that I finished most of the programming today, because I was a little nervous that I wouldn't be able to input all the Marbles in time.

    Photo courtesy of the new Itinera site: https://itinera.pitt.edu

    Categories: 
    • Mobility/Exchange
    • Visual Knowledge
    • Current Projects
    • Itinera
    • Undergraduate Work
    • VMW
  • Old Media, New Media Image

    Old Media and New Media. Image Credit: Flickr user mermaid, london street art: what are these?.

     

    New Media Preservation Strategies

    Cornell University Library has started a project. funded by the NEH, to investigate how best to preserve born-digital art objects. Their preliminary findings (survey-based) have just been published as "Interactive Digital Media Art Survey: Key Findings and Observations." The eventual goal is to publish generalizable best practices in this area. Those of you interested in such things should certainly head over there.

    Categories: 
    • Agency
    • Visual Knowledge
    • Faculty Work
    • VMW
  •  

    Upcoming Talk: Digital Preservation's Place in the Future of the Digital Humanities

    Ensuring long term access to digital information sounds like a technical problem. It seems like digital preservation should be a computer science problem. Far from it. In this lecture Trevor Owens, a digital archivist at the Library of Congress argues that digital preservation is in fact a core problem and issue at the heart of the future of the digital humanities. Bringing together perspectives from the history of technology, new media studies, public history, and archival theory, he suggests the critical role that humanities scholars and practitioners should play in framing and shaping the collection, organization, description, and modes of access to the historically contingent digital material records of contemporary society.

    Trevor Owens, Digital Archivist, Library of Congress
    Tuesday, March 18
    11:00 a.m.
    Information Sciences Building | Third Floor
    135 N. Bellefield Avenue

    Trevor Owens is a Digital Archivist with the National Digital Information Infrastructure and Preservation Program (NDIIPP) in the Office of Strategic Initiatives at the Library of Congress. At the Library of Congress, he works on the open source Viewshare cultural heritage collection visualization tool, as a member of the communications team, and as the co-chair for the National Digital Stewardship Alliance’s Infrastructure working group. Before joining the Library of Congress he worked for the Center for History and New Media and before that managed outreach for the Games, Learning, and Society Conference. He has a BA in the History of Science from the University of Wisconsin, an MA in American History from George Mason University and is currently finishing his doctorate in Research Methods in George Mason University’s College of Education and Human Development. http://trevorowens.org

    Categories: 
    • Agency
    • Temporalities
    • Visual Knowledge
    • Faculty Work
    • VMW