Undergraduate Work

    Waiting for people to come and take the survey.

     

    Egypt on the Nile: The New Life of The Carnegie Boat

    Museum Studies Intern at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History - Fall 2017

    Finally, working in Walton Hall in the Carnegie Museum of Natural History, my childhood dream has come true! I would be administering audience evaluations during my curatorial internship.  As I asked people to participate in my survey about the funerary boat I heard many interesting stories. Explaining the new ideas being proposed to show the boat in a different light really excited the people I was talking with, which in turn excited me even more about the exhibit. Talking about the boat’s 'lives' for the new exhibit is already bringing a new life into this forgotten treasure. 

    Walton Hall is on the third floor of the museum. Across the hall is the Alcoa Hall of American Indians. Walton Hall is a hidden gem, hiding on the 3rd floor. When you walk in you are immersed into the ancient world. Immediately to your right is the Carnegie Boat. Making your way through the exhibit you see objects from the reign of Senwosret III to the mysterious reign of Akhenaten, and further on. Of course, we have examples one of the most popular type of objects of any Egyptian exhibit, mummies! There are cat mummies, mummies that were sold under false pretenses, an actual ancient burial and of course some beautiful sarcophagi finish out the mummy area. A number of people told me about how much they loved the diorama of the temple craftsmen. I have to admit, I love them too. It is great to see a recreation of life in action.

    Dr. Erin Peters and her team are planning a digital interpretation of the boat that will showcase its various lives. The lives of the boat would start from the cedars of Lebanon spanning until present times. The idea is to show the importance of the boat and what it meant to the ancient Egyptians that were building it and the use for it in their afterlife. The first five of these lives are proposed to be a more visual aspect of the boat, the last five are proposed to be auditory. Showing the lumber being cut and shipped, the building process, the idea of the use for it the real world, the use in the spiritual world and finally the rediscovery of the boat. I asked visitors how they would enjoy seeing these lives in a visual way, what lives they liked the best out of those five and which if any they felt like might not need to be there. I also asked participants which ways they learned the best (by watching, listening, or physically interacting.) Watching and interacting have been the top responses. Overall my goal was to see how people would react to the idea of a new exhibit that includes digital technology and hands-on interaction. I am pleased to say that people have found this concept very pleasing. They are excited to see the exhibit updated, they are excited to learn more about Ancient Egypt as a topic as whole, and they are excited to be able to get a better grasp of the boat even if it is still behind the glass.

    Learn more about the Collecting Knowledge Pittsburgh initiative here

    Categories: 
    • Academic Interns
    • Undergraduate Work
    • Collecting Knowledge Pittsburgh

    Charles Dickens book

     

    Repairing, rehousing and rebuilding archives

    Museum Studies Intern at the University Library System (University of Pittsburgh Archive Service Center) - Fall 2017

    This semester I was able to intern at the University of Pittsburgh Archive Service Center on Thomas Blvd. I worked in the preservations department at the center. The main job for the interns in the preservations department is to repair and rehouse books and documents that are sent to us from the different libraries and collections that are housed in Pitt facilities. One of the first jobs I and other interns learned was how to disbound books. To disbound a book means to remove the pages from the bound volume, we would then clean the pages and remove leftover glue and string and recut the pages so they can be rebound at a later date.     

    One of the most important tasks I learned to do was build corrugated clamshells for books. A clamshell is a housing device built from cardboard like paper to be used as a shelter for books that have become fragile and need extra care. This task is something every intern learns and uses very often. In the preservations department, there is a whole wall filled with books that need rehousing and can be found at all levels of damage. The process of building a clamshell is the same for every book, the only unique part is the dimension needed for the clamshell. This can be tricky at times but once you do a few dozen of them, it becomes second nature. We house many different types of books in the preservation department, but one of the amazing parts of this internship is the chance to see something rare and unique. During the past month, I have been housing some very special books that are equally as beautiful in appearance as in words. The preservations department got a cart full of Charles Dickens novels. These books are from the 1840’s and in some cases are believed to be first editions! The outside covers of these books are gorgeous and ornate as well as having equally beautiful illustrations inside the books. Having the chance to see such unique books at the archives is a real treat and being able to work with people that have the same mindset as me when it comes to unique finds like this made this internship so much fun.     

    Lastly, the final project that I am working on at the archives has to do with something a little louder and cumbersome. In my final month working in the department, I was assigned solely to work on housing for musical instruments that need to be preserved. In the deep recesses of the department, there is a shelf that has three different instruments on it, a guitar, a drum and a horn. Each instrument with its own unique shape must have its own custom case made by hand. Each instrument will be encased in a foam box then that foam case will be put into a custom fit corrugated clamshell that will be used for extra protection. Each foam case has to be cut out from a large foam sheet, which is no easy task. What makes this task even more interesting is that these instruments are from a famous local jazz band from Pittsburgh’s history! 

    Working at the Archives has been an amazing experience for me. Having the opportunity to work so closely with artifacts and books have helped me further decide on my future profession which will most certainly have to do with curating and similar work.

    Learn more about the Collecting Knowledge Pittsburgh initiative here

    Categories: 
    • Academic Interns
    • Undergraduate Work
    • Collecting Knowledge Pittsburgh
  •  

    Political Interests of the Former Steel Industry

    Museum Studies Intern at Rivers of Steel National Heritage Area - Fall 2017

    My experience working with the Rivers of Steel National Heritage Area (RoS) has shown me new ways in which an organization focused on exhibitions and preservation connects with the history of the area it represents. Having been born and raised in Pittsburgh, I’ve enjoyed seeing its history up close and presented in unique ways.

    The project that I have been working on and will likely finish even after this semester is the creation of a new exhibition for the travelling ‘Steel Case’. The ‘Steel Case’ is currently exhibited at the ‘Indiana University of Pennsylvania’ and focuses on how the steel industry was presented in popular culture. My task was to design a new theme, pick a location for it to be presented, and create promotional material.

    The first portion of my time there, which ended up being a majority of my time, was going through the archives and learning what objects and exhibition materials RoS had with the goal of developing a focus for the ‘Steel Case’. This was definitely the hardest portion of the internship, but also the most fun. I went in with a rough theme already in mind, which was to look at some of the science that influenced the industry and how this was presented to industry heads and workers. Yet, as I spent more and more time within the archives I kept straying away from this idea while going off into tangents about labor strikes, propaganda, and many other parts of the 20th century steel industry. I eventually decided on a focus that highlighted the development of political ideals during the steel industry, specifically the rise of socialism and the associated propaganda that sought to weaken either capitalism or socialism. Some items included are articles about labor strikes, socialist newspapers and publications, memos to managers warning of the dangers of socialism to the labor environment, photos of leaders, awards from companies to its employees, illustrations of figureheads, and many more.

    Currently I am in the process of pulling these objects from the RoS archives and filling out the proper paperwork while creating some promotional material for the exhibition. I will likely continue the work into next year even after my graduation, as the process has taken much longer than expected and I would like to see the project come to completion. The subject matter is very unique and interesting, and I hope that the way in which I present the information to the public is succinct and eye-pleasing, yet capable of teaching the public about the 20th century politics that influenced the steel industry and America as a whole.

    Learn more about the Collecting Knowledge Pittsburgh initiative here

    Categories: 
    • Academic Interns
    • Undergraduate Work
    • Collecting Knowledge Pittsburgh
  • We do have visual evidence that this tree existed! To the right the sapling is pictured at the dedication ceremony carried by Iva Abraham.

     

    Student Journal: Stories Forgotten: A Gift Lost in Time…

    Kenneth Wahrenberger, 14 November 2017

    It has now been several days since our class has opened the Narratives of the Nationality Rooms exhibition in the UAG. Personally, hindsight of the project has been a medley of joyous pride at the work that has been accomplished and a critical analysis of things that could have been better. Standing in the back of the UAG “hallway” during the opening night of the exhibition, I tried to put my feet in the shoes of a visitor who just so happened to stumble into the gallery and had no prior education on the nature of the Nationality Rooms. Thinking retrospectively, the four archival documents marching down the wall pertaining to the Syria-Lebanon dedication ceremony stick out to me as opening a narrative that ought to be explored further. The documents show two newspaper articles, two instructional cards, and the speech script from the 1941 Syria-Lebanon Room dedication ceremony. All of the documents share the commonality of referring to the Syria-Lebanon committee’s gift of a cedar sapling to the University of Pittsburgh. Tree was gifted with the condition that it be planted on Pitt’s campus as an enduring landmark of the Syria-Lebanon cultural effort in Pittburgh. The cedar sapling is significant because of its rarity (being transplanted from a sacred grove of ancient cedar trees in Mount Lebanon), and its symbolic meaning for the unity of the Lebanese people. However, the story of the cedar sapling gift is complicated. Despite Pitt’s promise to plant the tree, there is no documented evidence that the tree was, in fact, planted. As a result of this ambiguity, I have jumped back into the archival material to try to uncover the full story of the mysterious cedar sapling. Here is what I have found:

    The cedar sapling was presented to Chancellor John Bowman during the dedication ceremony on 28 June 1941. Salloum Antoun Mokarzel (1881–1952), an influential Lebanese-American intellectual and publisher who lived in New York City, was responsible for gifting the tree to the University of Pittsburgh on behalf of the Syrian and Lebanese communities of America. Upon his arrival to the US, Salloum Mokarzel aided his older brother Na’oum Anthony Mokarzel in the publication of Al-Hoda (English: The Guidance), which was a daily Arabic language newspaper produced in the “Little Syria” neighborhood of New York City. The Mokarzel brothers were Maronite Catholics who immigrated to the US from the town of Freike on the slopes of Mount Lebanon, which at the time was still part of the Ottoman Empire. Na’oum founded Al-Hoda and produced the first issue in 1898. The purpose of the paper was to promote Lebanese nationalism and the political views of Maronitism, which advocated Christian dominance over the Muslim opposition in Lebanon. When Na’oum Mokarzel died in 1932, Salloum Mokarzel assumed the editorial leadership of Al-Hoda and held it until his own death in 1952. In addition, Salloum Mokarzel founded The Syrian World magazine and The Syrian-American Press in 1926, which was devoted to the celebration and cultural promotion of Syria. At the time of these publications, Syria was a term used for the entire French “Mandate for Syria and the Lebanon” and consisted of the modern-day states and territories of Syria, Lebanon, Jordan, and Palestine. The Syrian World magazine was the first English language magazine in the United States that was established by a Syrian immigrant. The magazine was created to educate the first generation of Syrian-Americans of their unique and ancient cultural heritage, and to strengthen their identity with their culture of origin. Unfortunately, during the Great Depression, financial issues caused Salloum Mokarzel to discontinue his publication.

    With this information, the context of the gift of the cedar sapling to the University of Pittsburgh can be pieced together. Salloum Mokarzel most likely saw the Syria-Lebanon Classroom in the Cathedral of Learning in the same spirit as The Syrian World magazine that he founded. Furthermore, the gift of the cedar sapling and its acquisition from the sacred cedar groves of Mount Lebanon makes sense when considering the hometown of the Mokarzel brothers in Lebanon and their connections with prominent Syrian and Lebanese figures as well-known media producers in the Arab diaspora. The father of the Mokarzel brothers was also a Maronite Catholic priest, and the brothers may have had familial ties to the keepers of the sacred cedar groves in Mount Lebanon. However, considering the fact that Salloum Mokarzel and his brother were prolific spokespersons for the anti-Muslim political Maronitism movement, I feel that the dominating presence of Maronite Catholics in the Islamic space of the Syrian Lebanon Room is intensified by the gift of a cedar sapling.

    As a side note, I also wanted to mention the other two Cedar of Lebanon trees that are significant to Pittsburgh’s history. According to the Mt. Lebanon Township Historical Society, Rev. Joseph Clokey (who served as Mt. Lebanon United Presbyterian Church’s minister from 1848 until 1855) brought back two Cedar of Lebanon trees from a trip he made to the Holy Lands. Rev. Clokey planted the trees in his yard near what is now Bower Hill Road/Clokey Avenue in 1850. When a post office opened adjacent to the cedar trees in 1855 on the corner of Washington and Bower Hill Road, the name “Mt. Lebanon” was given to the postal region. Unfortunately, both cedar trees were cut down in the 1940s around the time that the Syria-Lebanon Room was dedicated. To this day, “Mt. Lebanon” is still the name of the township and a school district surrounding the area where the two cedar trees originally took root.

    Lastly, I want to comment on the current state of the tree. Despite rigorous archival research, I have not been able to find the location of the cedar tree on Pitt’s campus. Again, as far as I can tell, there was no recorded evidence of the literal planting of the tree or the area on campus that it was planted. If you know the location of the cedar tree that was gifted at the dedication ceremony of the Syria-Lebanon Room, then please notify me immediately (my email is kennethtwahrenberger@gmail.com) because I am extremely curious. My current speculation is that the sapling died as a result of the unsuitable Pittsburgh weather and soil or the copious amounts of steel industry pollution during the 1940s that blocked the sun during the day and poisoned the air. Perhaps it was a combination of both of these factors. Suffice to say, the cedar sapling and the intentions of its donor is still somewhat a mystery to us. This project has taught me that information is sometimes lost with time.

    Categories: 
    • Undergraduate Work
    • UAG
    • Bronze rooster base with bending
    Bronze rooster base with bending

    Figure 1: Bronze rooster base with bending

     

    Student Journal: Conservation and Condition Reports

    Patricia Smith. November 7,  2017

    Conservation is often an essential part of museum and gallery work that is often overlooked by the casual visitor. As an intern with Gretchen Anderson, head of the Section of Conservation at Carnegie Museum of Natural History, I developed a range of skills in conservation that have been relevant for the preparation of Narratives of the Nationality Rooms: Immigration and Identity in Pittsburgh. Our Museum Studies Exhibition Seminar had its own conservation tasks to complete, which included creating condition reports for the items generously loaned by the Nationality Rooms Office and University Library System (ULS) archives. Condition reports can take many forms, depending on the type of object and the goal of the report. For our purposes, these reports serve as an intake record to document any damages that may occur in the various stages of transport and exhibition. The Documentation team was in charge of completing these reports. The following images detail some aspects of the objects that a conservator in a museum or a gallery might be asked to address.

    One of our key loans is a bronze rooster. This sculpture exhibits some physical damage, particularly around the base (Fig. 1). Notice the warping and bending. The physical damage does not necessarily devalue the object; damage and markings are part of its history and can reveal information such as provenance and production.

    In addition to physical damage in this case, there is also chemical damage. The green patina on this bronze sculpture of a Benin Queen Mother is a classic example of a chemical process called oxidation (Fig. 2). Bronze is an alloy that is primarily made of copper, and copper is a metal that is highly susceptible to oxidization. This means it reacts with oxygen molecules in the environment to form various copper oxides, which are usually harmless to the object and sometimes even desired because of the color. These oxides then continue to react to combine with elements such as sulfur and carbon. The Statue of Liberty, for example, is actually covered in an oxidized copper patina. It was once a warm brown. However, if the copper begins to combine with chlorides present in the environment, it will form copper chlorides, which can lead to a dangerous form of deterioration called “bronze disease.” At some point after our exhibition concludes, the Benin Bronze Queen Mother should be checked to ensure that the oxidation process at work here is not causing damage to the sculpture itself.

    Besides three-dimensional objects, conservators also work with paper objects like books and archival documents. The Archives & Special Collections Center of Hillman Library loaned several fragile documents for our exhibition, including an architectural design for the English Room (Fig. 3). Like the Benin Bronze discussed above, many of these documents display signs of physical damage. In the case of the English Room drawings, we took photographs to show that the creasing and tearing evident here is old damage, and did not occur during the course of our exhibition.

    Categories: 
    • Undergraduate Work
    • Spaces
    • UAG
  •  

    Student Journal: Seeing it all come together

    Xander Schempf, 24 October and 6 November 2017

    October 24

    As a class, we are currently in the stages right before the show really starts to pick up, or at least that’s how I’ve perceived it. Coming from the Installation group, it feels like planning can only go so far, and that once we get into the gallery to begin set up, things will come together and solutions to problems we didn’t know existed will be found. After multiple drafts with constant revisions and tweaks from fellow installation members, professors, and other classmates, we as a group have a pretty solid grasp on how things will be displayed.  The original plan of having Visual Knowledge in the front gallery, Identity in the rotunda, and Ritual in the hallway is intact (with just a few deviations). Within a week our installation group went from tentative guesses on locations to a well thought out layout of the upcoming exhibition. Next comes the physical installing of the objects, which is what I’m most looking forward to. Weeks of planning and scrapped ideas have led to this, so I hope for the best of luck!

    November 6

    Just a few days before the show opens, and the exhibition has truly come together. I've learned a lot about how a museum might operate from the de-installation of the previous show and the installation of ours. I learned many installation techniques such as proper lighting, display methods, handling of objects, and many more that I hope to bring to careers in my future. After it’s all installed, all that’s left to be done is to just let it happen. That's what I’m most excited about, just knowing that it’s installed and anyone can come and visit. 

    Categories: 
    • Undergraduate Work
    • Spaces
    • UAG
  •  

    Student Journal: What is Ruyi?

    Wendi Yu, 7 November 2017

    When you look at the vitrine that is filled with a set of ceremonial keys from the Nationality Rooms, an ornate key with gold accents will catch your eyes. Made for the Chinese Room, this ceremonial key is designed as a Ruyi (scepter), with a curved shape and a head fashioned like a cloud. But do you know what a Ruyi is, and what it represents in traditional Chinese culture?

    The Chinese term Ruyi is a compound of Ru “as; like” and Yi “wish; desire”, which had been used as early as the former Han Dynasty (206 BC – 24 AD). The Hanshu biography first recorded that Ruyi means “as you wish” in a quotation of scholar Jing Fang (77-37 BCE). There are two basic theories of the origin of the Ruyi. One is that Ruyi originated from Sanskrit Anuruddha, “a ceremonial scepter” used by Buddhist monks in India, who later brought it to China. The other is that the Ruyi was invented as a back scratcher because it had an apparent ability to reach parts of the human body that there normally impossible to reach.

    During its historical evolution, however, Ruyi became luxurious symbols of political power in the Qing dynasty (1644-1912 AD). A Ruyi was regularly used in imperial ceremonies, and they were awarded as gifts to and from the Emperor. Because of its elegant style, the Ruyi was also popular among the literati class.

    A Ruyi could be made from various materials, including jade, ivory, metal, coral, wood, lacquer, crystal, and precious gems. Craftsmen fashioned the head of each Ruyi as cloud, fist, flower, Lingzhi mushroom, or a bat, which all symbolize power and good fortune. Since the design of the Chinese Room in the Cathedral of Learning was inspired by the Forbidden City, which was the Emperor’s palace for more than 600 years, the shape of Ruyi was used as a model for its ceremonial key to represent the dynastic history of China. The Chinese characters "Ruyi" were also incised on its head, making the appearance of the key as an important motif of Chinese culture unmistakable.

    Categories: 
    • Undergraduate Work
    • UAG

    Shopping for furniture at Construction Junction for the Human Diorama in the new exhibition: We are Nature

     

    A Whale of a Tale: Archiving and Exhibition Design at The Carnegie Museum of Natural History

    Author: Eliza Wick

    Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Fellowship at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History - Summer 2017

    I came into my fellowship at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History with certain preconceptions. Namely, I had a preference and more experience with museums that may be more traditional, such as the Carnegie Museum of Art. But I was eager to see how a natural history museum differed from what I was used to. I also expected that I would be making decisions each day that would be effecting changes in the museum in a more direct way as well as contributing to the formation of future exhibits, however I quickly learned that that was a bit of a naïve and idealistic view of how a museum works. My work as an intern, while important, was more of an archival project in backtracking, documentation and organization of historical material and how that information related to current halls and future exhibitions.

    One thing that I quickly became aware of is how almost every museum has to operate from a perspective that is often overlooked: the museum as a financial entity. Despite being a non-profit, a museum still has to make enough money to do things like upkeep of permanent halls, creation of temporary exhibits, borrowing of traveling exhibits, paying employees, graphic design projects, and much more. Due to the fact that revenue is only generated really from grants, admission, and generous donations, creation and innovation must be brought down to reality and altered to fit the limited funds that most non-profits must face.

    With this in mind, many ideas have to be struck down to fit the reality of budget and time more so than I had naively expected. I thought that ideas could be implemented quickly and without limits; however I learned that museums by nature take time to implement new projects, ideas, halls, etc. Work must be reviewed by many people and departments because museum work stresses the collaborative and group effort.

    I remember someone describing the design and implementation of exhibitions as being for the long haul. Essentially you are hoping your ideas and efforts will come later in five years or so, resonating with a museum-goer deeply concerned for our natural world. Through particular implementation and design that you curated hopefully helps visitors become more interested in science or better understand a concept.

    Additionally, something I had not considered all the way through is how much a natural history museum differs from a more traditional art museum. A natural history museum requires much more preparation and planning of exhibitions in most cases than an art museum. There are factors like specimen acquisition, preservation, and preparation as well as thought mapping of how you want to educate the scientific topic in space.

    Natural history museums also make the majority of their own props, stands, cases, and anything else that will be going into the physical space. All of these considerations as well as protection of specimens and of the visitors means that much more time and energy must be put into the final product than an art museum where the pieces stand alone. In a way, the exhibition department in a natural history museum is like an artist and educator because they get to design and create the majority of the pieces in the exhibit. 

    There is also the fact that many exhibitions require that permanent changes are made to the physical building and like new walls made, old walls taken down, blocked exits, new walking patterns, etc. that become more costly and laborious.

    Understanding the museum budget, raising money, and how finances and time affect production allowed me to better understand the history of the institution and made my archiving process much more informed and tailored to a museum as opposed to another entity.

    I treasured my fellowship, most of all, because it satisfied my personal fascination and admiration for archival research. I also cherished the fact that I personally got to make choices that affected the organization and logic of their exhibition department archival system.

    While archival research and organization may not seem like a pressing issue, this information is actually essential for knowledge about past exhibitions and renovations, current halls, and for the production and planning of future exhibitions. For example, there was a traveling exhibition in the mid-2000s about a whale. The exhibition required that a life-size whale be installed from the ceiling. This required some significant changes to the rooms walls, ceilings, and general layout.

    It may not seem like a major issue in the moment, but it means that any blueprint of the area that was dated prior to this alteration would be significantly off in its measurements. And, because it is a traveling show, the whale was only temporary, but the alterations were permanent. Therefore, an updated blueprint needed to be made to avoid confusion in the future. This became especially significant after the dissolution of the exhibitions department and the later revival of it because there were many old blueprints that had dimensions that did not match the current features of the space. Being off by even an inch in one’s measurement of a room can be tragic for the installation of a future show because items might not fit. Hopefully this serves as a very tangible reason as to why archival upkeep, intelligence, and research is so important.

    What can be done to help archival get more attention and communicate its importance?

    I believe that keeping the relationship open between our History of Art and Architecture Department at the University of Pittsburgh and the exhibitions department of the Carnegie Museum of Natural History would be the best way to help further develop and explore these archives as well as be mutually beneficial to both institutions. It would be valuable work if a future intern would use my archives and/or guides to conduct research on the institution or exhibits, further develop the archives, or document the current halls and exhibits on display now as a proactive project for the future of the archives. I would love to stay in touch with any future students that might encounter these archives or the wonderful group of staff that make up the exhibitions department.

    Learn more about the Collecting Knowledge Pittsburgh initiative here

    Categories: 
    • Academic Interns
    • Undergraduate Work
    • Collecting Knowledge Pittsburgh
  •  

    Weekly Update For Exhibition for HAA 1020

    This past week, going into this week has been dedicated to finishing up the installation at the gallery. Everyone is working hard to finish mounting wall texts as well as setting up all the display cases and move in the last of the objects in the different galleries. Each team is finalizing their areas of the gallery, each team has different challenges in presenting the objects for the show. Some groups work with vitrines and display cases, while others work with manikins and wall mounted objects.

    The class has also finished installing the Avinoff watercolor gallery while installing a few student were able to learn in detail about the effects of lighting on watercolor paintings as well as how to handle the artwork. One of the main challenges with displaying such delicate artwork is the effect light has on the paint. Students were given a device that measures light intensity. this device is used in knowing what range of intensity is safe for objects and artwork to be shown in. 

    Categories: 
    • Undergraduate Work
    • Spaces
    • UAG
  •  

    Student Journal: Labels and Posters and Postcards, Oh My!

    Darien Pepple, 24 October 2017

    In the past week, we have taken a few significant steps in our exhibition production process. First, everyone created labels for the items that they have chosen to focus on within their planning group. The three planning groups, known as “visual knowledge,” “ritual and sacred spaces,” and “identity,” were designated to reflect three of the research Constellations of the Department of History of Art and Architecture and have been used to organize the exhibition into three main sections in the University Art Gallery. We are now completing our final edits on these labels before they are given to the publications working group for final review. As a member of the publications group, I will be proofreading the labels that have been submitted to ensure that no grammar or spelling errors make their way into our exhibition space. I am looking forward to reading everyone’s labels and learning more about the amazing objects that will be on display.

    An exciting decision was also made this past week, as the class voted for a poster design that will serve as the central advertisement for our exhibition around campus. Members of the publications group created three final submissions after the initial drafts were discussed in class. The chosen design exemplifies the diversity of the Nationality Rooms and presents just a few of the meaningful objects that will be displayed in our exhibition. The next step in this aspect of the preparation was the incorporation of this design into the format of a postcard. In the publications group, we have come up with a number of postcard design drafts, and these will be finalized later this week. It is amazing to see our exhibition concept and goals come to life through these visuals, and I cannot wait to see them once they have been printed.

    It has been wonderful to notice how far the different working and planning groups have come through the products that we are beginning to see. Last week, we were able to walk through the gallery space and discuss where specific objects should be displayed. It is exciting to see everything come together for the show, and in just a few short weeks, it will be open to the public!

    Categories: 
    • Undergraduate Work
    • Spaces
    • UAG

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